(Fahrenheit) Common Temperature Scale (Years of 1648 & 1706)
0° - 96° = Fahrenheit deg. common temp. scale (0 F - 96 F)
32° & 96° = Fahrenheit deg. common temperature reference points
-40° = -40 Centigrade old (not Hectograde) (-40 Ct grade old)
-38° = F deg. freezing point mercury - Hg
421.67 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. freezing point mercury - Hg
-25.6° = -25.6 Reaumurgrade (-25.6 R grade)
(deep freeze) = food freezer interior std. temp. for 3 mth. storage
(deep freeze) = approx. freezing point of solution 1/4 part wt. seasalt & 3/4 part wt. rainwater
459.67 Rk deg. = approx. freezing point of solution 1/4 part wt. seasalt & 3/4 part wt. rainwater
459.67 Rk deg = Rankine deg. ref. point from absolute (0) temp.pt. (Rk deg. = F deg.)
32° = F deg. freezing point distilled water
491.67 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. freezing point distilled water
491.67 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. ref. point from absolute (0) temp.pt. (Rk deg. = F deg.)
32.018° = F deg. triple point distilled water (vapour/water/ice)
491.688 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. triple point distilled water
39.2° = F deg. max.dens. distilled water
498.87 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. max.dens. distilled water
75.714° = 75.714 Celsiusgrade old (75.714 C grade old)
96° = F deg. human armpit temp. during sleep
555.67 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. human armpit temp. during sleep
96.364° = 96.364 de Lisle deg. (96.364 D deg.)
96.8° = F deg. human mouth temp. during sleep
556.47 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. human mouth temp. during sleep
176° = F deg. boiling point spirit of wine @ sea level
635.67 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. boiling point spirit of wine @ sea level
212° = F deg. boiling point distilled water @ sea level
671.67 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. boiling point distilled water @ sea level
674° = F deg. boiling point mercury - Hg @ sea level
1133.67 Rk deg. = Rankine deg. boiling point mercury - Hg @ sea level
outdoorsman thermometer = in shade 5 ft. above earth/grass/snow, away from buildings & concrete
32° - 212° = 180° (18.1‰ expansion of mercury from 32° to 212°)
     
32° - 96° = 64 indications of 1° each (1° x2x2x2x2x2x2)
     
(32° frost) = 3 months unfrozen food storage (* * * * freezer stars)
(32° frost) = 3 months frozen food storage (* * * freezer stars)
(24° frost) = 1 month frozen food storage (* * freezer stars)
16° (16° frost) = 1 week frozen food storage (* freezer star)
24° (8° frost) = 3 days frozen food storage (no freezer star)
beef rare = 144° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
ham smoked = 144° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
beef medium = 160° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
bacon canadian = 160° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
beef well-done = 168° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
pork = 168° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
lamb rare = 168° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
veal = 168° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
lamb medium = 176° internal temperature via flesh/meat thermometer
   
275° = very slack/slow oven  
325° = slack/slow oven  
375° = moderate oven  
425° = hot/quick oven  
475° = very hot/quick oven (451° paper burns)
     
288° = very slack/slow oven (proposed only)  
336° = slack/slow oven (proposed only)  
384° = moderate oven (proposed only)  
432° = hot/quick oven (proposed only)  
480° = very hot/quick oven (proposed only) (451° paper burns)
       
250° = mark S oven (Simmer)
275° = mark 1 oven  
300° = mark 2 oven  
325° = mark 3 oven  
350° = mark 4 oven  
375° = mark 5 oven  
400° = mark 6 oven  
425° = mark 7 oven  
450° = mark 8 oven (451° paper burns)
475° = mark 9 oven  
     
224° = #1 oven (proposed only) (212° water boils)
256° = #2 oven (proposed only)  
288° = #3 oven (proposed only)  
320° = #4 oven (proposed only)  
352° = #5 oven (proposed only)  
384° = #6 oven (proposed only)  
416° = #7 oven (proposed only)  
448° = #8 oven (proposed only) (451° paper burns)
480° = #9 oven (proposed only)  
"Yet before I undertake a review of these experiments it will be necessary to say a
few words about the thermometers that I have built, and the division of the scale
they use, and in addition the method of producing a vacuum I have used. I make
two particular types of thermometer, one of which is filled with alcohol and the other
with mercury. Their length varies in accordance with the use to which they are put.
Yet all use the same scale, and their differences relate only to their fixed limits. The
scale of those thermometers that are used only for observations on the weather
begins with zero and ends on the 96th degree. The division of the scale depends on
three fixed points, which can be determined in the following manner. The first is
found in the uncalibrated part or beginning of the scale, and is determined by a
mixture of ice, water, and ammonium chloride or even sea salt. If the thermometer is
placed in this mixture, its' liquid descends as far as the degree that is marked with a
zero. This experiment succeeds better in winter than in summer. The second point is
obtained if water and ice are mixed without the aforementioned salts. When the
thermometer is placed in this mixture, its' liquid reaches the 32nd degree. I call this
"freezing point". For still waters are already covered with a very thin layer of ice
when the liquid of the thermometer touches this point in winter. The third point is
situated on the 96th degree. Alcohol expands up to this point when it is held in the
mouth or under the armpit of a living man in good health until it has completely
acquired his body heat. But if the temperature of a man suffering from fever or some
other heating disease is to be investigated, another thermometer must be used, with
a scale extended to the 128th or 132nd degree. I have not yet discovered by
experiment whether these degrees are sufficient for the most intense heat of some
fever, but it is scarcely credible that the heat of any fever should exceed the degrees
I have described. When a thermometer is being used to investigate the temperature
of boiling liquids, it too starts from zero and contains 600 degrees, for around this
point mercury itself (with which the thermometer is filled) begins to boil."
  Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit, 1724
   
Fahrenheit 451 = by Ray Bradbury, Town of Los Angeles, Calif. pub. Oct. 1953, Ballantine #41
Fahrenheit 451 = temperature @ which Bible book paper bursts into flame
Fahrenheit 451 = Jul. 19th 1553 - Nov. 17th 1558, Papist Queen "Bloody Mary" Mary I Tudor
Fahrenheit 451 = Jan.20 1554/5 - Nov.17 1558, english Bibles & 336 Protestants burn. @stake
Fahrenheit 451 = Oct.16 1555 Hugh Latimer, Bishop of Worcester & Martyr burned Oxford, Eng.
Fahrenheit 451 = Oct.16 1555 Nicholas Ridley, Bishop of Rochester & Martyr burn. Oxford, Eng.
Fahrenheit 451 Oct.16 1555, "Be of good cheer, Master Ridley, and play the man, for we shall
  this day light such a candle in England as I trust by God's grace shall never
  be put out." Hugh Latimer
     
4 fl. cups milk = milk group - milk, soft cheese, soup, pudding, ice cream
2 fl. cups meat = meat gp. - flesh/fish/fowl, egg, hd. cheese, meaty soup, beans, peanut butter
4 fl. cups veg. & fruit = green & yellow vegetables & fruit group - includes 1 citrus fruit & 1 tomato
4 fl. cups bread = carbohydrate group - wholemeal bread, potato, root veg., cereal, rice, pasta
14 fl. cups food = 7 fl.pt. = 6 dry pt. = 6 av.lb. wheat
16 fl. cups water = able-bodied outdoorsman's daily drinking water - approx. only
16 fl. cups water = 8 fl.pt. = 8 av.lb. wine (1 fl.gal. = 8 fl.pt.)
14 av.lb. food & water = 6 av.lb. food + 8 av.lb. water (1 av.st. food & water)
     
28 av.lb. 3 av.oz. = UK able-bodied seaman's wk. rations (21 meals) (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
3 av.lb.   = soft bread (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
4 av.lb.   = biscuit (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
3 av.lb.   = salt beef (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
2 av.lb.   = salt pork (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
2 av.lb. 4 av.oz. = preserved meat (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 12 av.oz. = fish (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
6 av.lb.   = potatoes (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 8 av.oz. = dried or compressed vegetables (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
2 av.lb.   = flour (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 8 av.oz. = oatmeal (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 1 3/4 av.oz. = tea (21 x 1/12 = 1 3/4) (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 4 av.oz. = coffee   (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
1 av.lb. 4 av.oz. = sugar   (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 5 1/4 av.oz. = condensed milk (21 x 1/4 = 5 1/4) (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 8 av.oz. = butter (margarine is illegal) (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
1 av.lb.   = marmalade or jam (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 8 av.oz. = syrup or molasses (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
- 4 av.oz. = suet (Merchant Ship. Act 1906)
         
LEATHER SEALER'S OFFICE, Londonderry, Vt. April 8th 1826 Rory Ely Cole
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Copyright © MMII Rory Ely Cole